Yvana Mols attorney

YVANA MOLS

Yvana Mols is a 2013 JD graduate from Emory Law in Atlanta, GA and is licensed to practice in Oregon and Georgia. Yvana practices in the areas of juvenile law and criminal defense, and has a background in Social Security disability. Since moving to Oregon in 2015, she has worked both in the Office of Hearing Operations for Social Security in Portland, OR and in private practice at Schneider, Kerr & Robichaux where she represented clients at administrative hearings. Prior to 2015, Yvana taught, published articles, and coordinated two international programs as a postdoctoral fellow at the Feminism and Legal Theory Project and the Vulnerability and the Human Condition Initiative, both at Emory Law School. While in law school, she worked with the Barton Center for Child Law and Policy and the Committee on Justice for Children, focusing lobbying and policy work on behalf of court-involved youth in Georgia. Also in law school, Yvana co-founded the Vulnerability and the Human Condition Initiative Student Advisory Board, and served as board member for Law Students for Reproductive Justice, and Executive Symposium Editor for the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal. Before law school, Yvana worked in higher education, both as a professor and administrator. She has taught college courses in logic, ethics, and composition, and has presented her scholarly work at conferences and workshops across the US and Canada. She completed a Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education and Philosophy at Trinity Christian College, and a Master of Arts in the History of Philosophy at the Institute for Christian Studies at University of Toronto.

Areas of Practice

Education

  • Emory University School of Law (J.D., 2013)
  • Institute for Christian Studies (M.A., History of Philosophy, 2008)
  • Trinity Christian College (B.A., Elementary Education & Philosophy, 2004)

Admitted to Practice

  • Oregon
  • Georgia

Professional Activities

  • Oregon State Bar Association
  • Oregon Criminal Defense Lawyers Association